One thing I beg of the Lord, one thing will I ask: that I may live in the house of the Lord all the days of my life.

Obviously, I didn’t stick to the original schedule of blog posting that I intended to.  I apologize for that.  After Sunday, my daily itinerary in Rome became very, very busy.  Due to our fast-paced schedule that involved walking/running almost everywhere on tough cobblestone streets, by the time I returned back to the hotel each evening I wanted to do nothing but to shower, take care of my poor feet, and go quickly to sleep.  Also I stopped having much of an Internet connection after the first few days.  While I could not remain digitally connected with you, dear friends and family, you were certainly with me in my thoughts and prayers.  At the end of this post I’ll let you know when and where I remembered your intentions, beginning on Monday where I left off.
Intentions:
Nota bene–These are the intentions I purposely listed for each day to not forget them.  I thought about and prayed for all of them at least twice, I’m sure, spontaneously at other times.  Your prayer requests really helped me to strengthen my faith, and my connection with all of you specifically and humanity in general as brothers and sisters.  Each and every one of you is so important in the eyes of God, and so is everyone you meet.  So thank you very much for allowing me to remember you on my pilgrimage.
Monday, April 2
Mass at the Catacombs of St. Callixtus
RCM, LEB, LR, MR, AR, MPR, AR, TFM, TM, NJM, ZTM, JEJ, ABJ, MIJ, GS, KMT, CM, BJL, SL, PL, RL, AJDS, Deacon MV, AC, JMW, AN, BSD, MCM(D)
Tuesday, April 3
Mass at Argogrande, a center of Opus Dei
MCG & mother, VPL, KM, Br. DDB and intentions, LD and intentions, Women of Grandevue (EM, LC, A, AA, L, GC), CAL, EL, FM, JMR, MM
Wednesday, April 4
Mass at Fraterna Domus (our hotel) and the Audience with our Holy Father Pope Benedict XVI
AM, LK, ER, KM, SRM, PV, EW, LP and intentions, DD, MCG
Holy Thursday, April 5 and Good Friday, April 6
Focused on meditation of the day’s feasts/fasts and general intentions for the Pope, the Church, the world, and all souls.
Holy Saturday, April 7
AO, LET, ES, CF, JG, AR and intentions, JM, AJM and intentions, KSBS

Hosanna, Filio David!

Hello again!  It’s currently late at night on Palm Sunday, April 1 here in Roma.  This morning (after a light breakfast and the best coffee I have ever tasted), we departed early for 9:30am Mass at St. Peter’s square.  I didn’t take many pictures of the Mass, of course, because I wanted to absorb as much of it as I could, spiritually.  Looking at the world through a camera is no way to do that.  Although, picture number four in the gallery below was pretty exciting to take!  After the Mass, we walked around a bit before arriving at our lunch at Rossopomodoro, which was excellent.  Then we made our way to the crypt of St. Josemaría, where there is no photography allowed.  In other news, my broken Italian-Spanish language combo is improving, and has been useful when I need things like a restroom or some gelati.
  1. My view at Mass in St. Peter’s this morning for Palm Sunday.
  2. The ever-stylish Swiss guard uniform.
  3. Swiss Guard shoes.
  4. This is how close I was to my beloved Papa!  Must have been five feet away when he processed through the aisle after Mass.  I got to see his kind, grandfatherly smile as he reached out his hand to us as he was passing by, just seconds before I took the shot.
  5. The Museo Nazionale di Castel Saint’Angelo
  6. Just the friendly neighborhood Roman Centurion. (Rory?)
  7. Me, down by the river in front of the Angelus bridge.
  8. One of those cool exterior wall art display things that are all over the city.
  9. Street sign on the way to the Villa Sacchetti (the women’s residence, above the crypt of St. Josemaria)
  10. A puppy we passed by on the way!  He was so nice, and very eager to say hi to me!
  11. The exterior of Santa Maria del Popolo, which looks like it is kind of falling apart, but is an absolute treasure trove on the inside.
  12. The main altar at S. Maria del Popolo, which was gorgeous, but is kind of outdone by its left side altar, where there was no photography allowed (but here’s one I found online), because it is home to two original Caravaggio paintings!  (The Crucifixion of St. Peter, and the Conversion of Saint Paul on the Road to Damascus)
  13. The obelisk with heiroglyphics in the center of the Piazza del Popolo
  14. Closer look at the Latin text at the base of the obelisk
  15. Entrance to the Piazza del Popolo, as seen from the center.
  16. The cobblestone streets, which are pretty, but kill your feet, and are probably slippery when it rains.

Initials of specific intentions I prayed for at the papal Mass and various chapels today:  TLS, KJS, SMS, LEB, DAF, JCF, SLS, JLS, AL, BSL, TL, CSJ, and all my deceased family members.

Getting Ready for Roma!

I’m leaving tomorrow for my pilgrimage to Rome!!  Right now I’m packing, which obviously includes packing for my physical and academic needs, but for this particular trip also means packing my spiritual “bags” with prayer intentions of my relatives and friends that I will take with me to all the Masses we will be attending.  If you have any intentions, don’t forget to email me, or text me, or comment here if you are comfortable doing that.  As long as I have it in some written medium, your intentions will make their way to my list, and to Rome during the holiest week of the year.  I’m hoping to be able to blog every night, with stories and pictures, and if I do, I’ll include at the bottom of each post the initials of people whose intentions were remembered at Mass that day.

Bis Orat Qui Bene Cantat

Illuminated Manuscript With Chant Neumes

Photo Credit: ffom.org

Good news, Internet people!  I received an email earlier this evening informing me that the paper I submitted to this year’s UNIV Congress in Rome has been selected to be presented at the conference!  So not only am I going to the Eternal City during the holiest week of the year, I also get to talk to some sort of audience there about one of my favorite things ever, Gregorian chant!  So now I guess I have to figure out what to say.  I heard a speaker once (the philosopher Alastair McIntyre) read an essay of his out loud to us, pausing every so often to engage us in discussion about the content.  I think that format could work for my paper, and I’m more than happy to get feedback so that I can really get to the issues my audience wants to hear about.  I’d love to hear what you think about that format, or if you have any other ideas.

The title of this post is the title of my paper.  It is a quote from St. Augustine and translates “He who chants well prays twice”.  You can read the whole paper here.  If you’re thinking, “I want to know what you wrote about, but I don’t want to read NINE WHOLE PAGES”, no problem!  Just read my abstract, posted below.  I’ll keep you all updated on my trip and such.  There will be plenty to write about.

Abstract
This essay by Kerri Sullivan seeks to make the reader aware that Gregorian chant is–and always has been–the cornerstone of Catholic music for worship.  It describes briefly the history of Gregorian chant and the Liturgy, then discusses the ways in which the chant is most befitting of the Mass.  This discussion is modeled on the description of the Mass’s meaning and purpose in the Second Vatican Council document Sacrosanctum Concilium.  The essay concludes with some practical suggestions for using music, especially chant, to re-invigorate Catholic liturgical worship today.  As the Mass is the “source, center, and summit of Christian life” (CCC 1324), Catholics have a solemn responsibility to ensure that it is celebrated properly according to the mission of the Church.  To safeguard this heavenly treasure for the benefit of souls, it is fitting to incorporate that music which has served the Mass so well for twenty centuries: Gregorian chant.
UPDATE: (Mar 6, 7pm)
I only have ten minutes to present this.  Guess it’s going to be another boring powerpoint without discussion, or perhaps a Prezi.