Hello, new friends from my UNIV presentation!

St. Peter statue outside St. Peter's Basilica

St. Peter statue outside St. Peter's Basilica (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Thank you so much for your interest in Gregorian Chant in the Liturgy!  It makes me truly glad to see so many people of our generation drawn towards the chant and the heightened sense of the sacred that it lends to the Mass.  Bis Orat Qui Bene Cantat was a labor of love, and I’m eternally grateful to my benefactors Dr. Kathleen Glenister Roberts of the Duquesne University Honors College, Fr. James McCloskey of the Office of Mission and Identity, and Dean Edward Kocher of the Mary Pappert School of Music, without which my presentation to you would not have been possible.
Below I have posted, for your convenience, a link to the full text of my paper, the new and innovative chant resource The Simple English Propers, the congregational pew resource The Parish Book of Chant, and the website of the Church Music Association of America (CMAA).  I received several questions about how to go about introducing chant to a group that is unfamiliar with it.  If you are interested in making Gregorian Chant more available in your parish or diocese, these resources will take you far.  Nota bene: All Gregorian Chant and most of sacred polyphony is in the public domain, so downloading copies of it is always, always free.  Just like the rest of the best things in life.  If you’re really passionate about learning chant and how to teach it, I recommend attending the CMAA’s annual Colloquium.  I went last summer, and there I learned to read Solesmes notation (the most common chant notation, standardized in 1888) well, I learned about the different genres within chant and their position and function in the Liturgy, I learned how to conduct chant (very, very different from standard conducting), and I networked with people from across the USA and the UK who were much better educated about traditional Catholic music than I was.
I didn’t mean for this to turn into an advertisement for the CMAA.  But, it is what it is.  Without further ado, dear reader, your links:

One thing I beg of the Lord, one thing will I ask: that I may live in the house of the Lord all the days of my life.

Obviously, I didn’t stick to the original schedule of blog posting that I intended to.  I apologize for that.  After Sunday, my daily itinerary in Rome became very, very busy.  Due to our fast-paced schedule that involved walking/running almost everywhere on tough cobblestone streets, by the time I returned back to the hotel each evening I wanted to do nothing but to shower, take care of my poor feet, and go quickly to sleep.  Also I stopped having much of an Internet connection after the first few days.  While I could not remain digitally connected with you, dear friends and family, you were certainly with me in my thoughts and prayers.  At the end of this post I’ll let you know when and where I remembered your intentions, beginning on Monday where I left off.
Intentions:
Nota bene–These are the intentions I purposely listed for each day to not forget them.  I thought about and prayed for all of them at least twice, I’m sure, spontaneously at other times.  Your prayer requests really helped me to strengthen my faith, and my connection with all of you specifically and humanity in general as brothers and sisters.  Each and every one of you is so important in the eyes of God, and so is everyone you meet.  So thank you very much for allowing me to remember you on my pilgrimage.
Monday, April 2
Mass at the Catacombs of St. Callixtus
RCM, LEB, LR, MR, AR, MPR, AR, TFM, TM, NJM, ZTM, JEJ, ABJ, MIJ, GS, KMT, CM, BJL, SL, PL, RL, AJDS, Deacon MV, AC, JMW, AN, BSD, MCM(D)
Tuesday, April 3
Mass at Argogrande, a center of Opus Dei
MCG & mother, VPL, KM, Br. DDB and intentions, LD and intentions, Women of Grandevue (EM, LC, A, AA, L, GC), CAL, EL, FM, JMR, MM
Wednesday, April 4
Mass at Fraterna Domus (our hotel) and the Audience with our Holy Father Pope Benedict XVI
AM, LK, ER, KM, SRM, PV, EW, LP and intentions, DD, MCG
Holy Thursday, April 5 and Good Friday, April 6
Focused on meditation of the day’s feasts/fasts and general intentions for the Pope, the Church, the world, and all souls.
Holy Saturday, April 7
AO, LET, ES, CF, JG, AR and intentions, JM, AJM and intentions, KSBS

Hosanna, Filio David!

Hello again!  It’s currently late at night on Palm Sunday, April 1 here in Roma.  This morning (after a light breakfast and the best coffee I have ever tasted), we departed early for 9:30am Mass at St. Peter’s square.  I didn’t take many pictures of the Mass, of course, because I wanted to absorb as much of it as I could, spiritually.  Looking at the world through a camera is no way to do that.  Although, picture number four in the gallery below was pretty exciting to take!  After the Mass, we walked around a bit before arriving at our lunch at Rossopomodoro, which was excellent.  Then we made our way to the crypt of St. Josemaría, where there is no photography allowed.  In other news, my broken Italian-Spanish language combo is improving, and has been useful when I need things like a restroom or some gelati.
  1. My view at Mass in St. Peter’s this morning for Palm Sunday.
  2. The ever-stylish Swiss guard uniform.
  3. Swiss Guard shoes.
  4. This is how close I was to my beloved Papa!  Must have been five feet away when he processed through the aisle after Mass.  I got to see his kind, grandfatherly smile as he reached out his hand to us as he was passing by, just seconds before I took the shot.
  5. The Museo Nazionale di Castel Saint’Angelo
  6. Just the friendly neighborhood Roman Centurion. (Rory?)
  7. Me, down by the river in front of the Angelus bridge.
  8. One of those cool exterior wall art display things that are all over the city.
  9. Street sign on the way to the Villa Sacchetti (the women’s residence, above the crypt of St. Josemaria)
  10. A puppy we passed by on the way!  He was so nice, and very eager to say hi to me!
  11. The exterior of Santa Maria del Popolo, which looks like it is kind of falling apart, but is an absolute treasure trove on the inside.
  12. The main altar at S. Maria del Popolo, which was gorgeous, but is kind of outdone by its left side altar, where there was no photography allowed (but here’s one I found online), because it is home to two original Caravaggio paintings!  (The Crucifixion of St. Peter, and the Conversion of Saint Paul on the Road to Damascus)
  13. The obelisk with heiroglyphics in the center of the Piazza del Popolo
  14. Closer look at the Latin text at the base of the obelisk
  15. Entrance to the Piazza del Popolo, as seen from the center.
  16. The cobblestone streets, which are pretty, but kill your feet, and are probably slippery when it rains.

Initials of specific intentions I prayed for at the papal Mass and various chapels today:  TLS, KJS, SMS, LEB, DAF, JCF, SLS, JLS, AL, BSL, TL, CSJ, and all my deceased family members.